Blog Category - Stress and Coping

Radical Acceptance

January 15, 2017 in Stress and Coping

By Valerie Siegman - - Radical acceptance was developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan in her quest to answer the question; why do some people get destroyed by suffering and other people grow through suffering? Dr. Linehan studied and researched saints, holocaust survivors, survivors of torture in South America and people who had experienced abject rejection. Those who grew despite adversity somehow seemed to find a way to radically accept that suffering had come. They seemed to accept whatever moment they were in. She named this learned ability “Radical Acceptance” because it had a deep, committed quality to that acceptance.


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WHAT'S THE BUZZ ABOUT STRESS?

July 03, 2015 in Stress and Coping

by Dr. Jeanne Peterson Since 2007, the American Psychological Association has commissioned an annual nationwide survey as part of its Mind/Body Health campaign to examine the state of stress across the country and understand its impact. We include here some excerpted highlights from the report.


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Mindfulness

January 15, 2017 in Stress and Coping

By Dr. Jenn Tickal - - Mindfulness involves acceptance and awareness and is useful in many areas of life. One can learn types of meditation and learn how to focus on a specific object, sound, movement, etc. For example, looking around the room that you are in at this moment, find one object and continue to visually explore this object for several minutes...thinking only of the object and its various qualities.


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Could You Be Stressing Your Kid?

July 03, 2015 in Stress and Coping

by Dr. Chris Berrios If you’re a parent, you may experience stress on a regular basis. Some of us are better at managing stress than others. Either way, stress can be normal as it is the result of the demands placed on us and our ability to meet them. These demands often come from outside sources, such as family, jobs, friends or school. Stress can also come from within us, often related to what we think we should be doing versus what we’re actually able to do. For kids, who are like sponges, stress can be naturally felt in difficult circumstances or it can be a learned response. In fact, research suggests that beyond a child’s disposition, a parent’s stress level can affect a child’s very makeup, including his or her risk of mood disorders or addiction, and can affect symptoms in those with disorders like ADHD and autism.


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Improving Mood By Building Experiences of Mastery

June 14, 2016 in Stress and Coping

by Dr. Jennifer Richardson - - Are you someone who is struggling to find enjoyment in your day to day routine? Or perhaps you may be someone who feels increasingly “stuck” or unhappy? Maybe your energy level and motivation has decreased and you find that you have become increasingly isolated from friends and family whom you used to enjoy spending time with? If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions and have felt this way for a few weeks or longer, then keep reading and follow these suggestions to begin to improve your mood.


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Stress related to test taking - The impact on children

July 03, 2015 in Stress and Coping

by Dr. Gina Zuccolo School, quizzes, tests, after-school activities, homework…the list of children’s responsibilities is vast when it comes to their education and development. These tasks in themselves can be stressful for children, but what happens for children when standardized testing is thrown in the mix? In the state of Florida, the FCAT has been the most recognized name as the required standardized testing implemented via the No Child Left Behind legislation. Beginning in the 2014-2015 school year, the state began administering the FSA to replace the FCAT. Although there is a different acronym, a similar principle exists. For example, the standardized testing impacts not only evaluation of student performance and passage to the next grade (in certain circumstances), but also impacts teacher evaluations and overall school performance evaluations. With this increased focus on standardized testing performance, how are children coping with the pressure?


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The Quiet Power of Acceptance

June 14, 2016 in Stress and Coping

By Dr. Jill Langer - - A wise mentor once told me “People come to therapy when they have an unsolvable problem that must be solved.” Can you relate to this dilemma? At one time or another in our lives, we all struggle with something that causes us difficulty or suffering and that does not yield itself to being solved, at least not in any way we can find. Common struggles include our relationships, family, career or school, health, weight, feelings, anxiety, and insomnia, to name a few.


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The Importance of Social and Emotional Support

July 03, 2015 in Stress and Coping

by Dr. Jill Langer “I’m so stressed!” We say and hear this so often, being stressed can seem inevitable and we forget the dangerous effects brought on by poorly managed stress. The American Psychological Association has long recognized the importance of understanding and mitigating the impact of stress on our emotional and physical health. They have published research on stress each year since 2007. This research has shown both a strong relationship between stress and negative impacts on our health as well an important factor that affects both: Social and emotional support. The APA survey findings show that having someone in your life who you can ask for emotional support is correlated with having lower stress levels.


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Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Rest

February 27, 2016 in Stress and Coping

Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Rest By Dr. Richardson Are you someone who frequently tosses and turns for hours at a time trying to get to sleep? Or, are you someone who falls asleep quickly and then wakes up in the middle of the night and cannot get back to sleep again? Individuals who have struggled to get a good night’s rest over a lengthy period of time can attest that lack of sleep really affects how you function and feel the following day. Oftentimes, those who do not get enough rest, experience decreased energy, fatigue throughout the day, increased irritability, decreased focus and concentration, and sometimes increased feelings of depression and/or anxiety. The good news is that there are several strategies you can learn to help you rest and get the sleep you know is so important to your well-being and optimal daily functioning.


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Anxiety - Coping with and Conquering Fears

January 23, 2014 in Stress and Coping

by Jennifer Richardson, M.A. Studies have shown that individuals who experience frequent anxiety often misperceive a situation or possible event as being more dangerous or likely to occur than it really is. For example, imagine you’re boarding an airplane and find your heart starts pounding, your palms become sweaty, and your breathing rate has increased. As you make your way to your seat your mind starts to focus in on a story you saw on the news about a plane crash. You briefly overhear another passenger talking about a storm headed in the direction where your plane is going. You sit in your seat and start to feel a sense of panic and want nothing more at that moment than to get up and flee from the plane to solid ground and safety. During such an experience it can be difficult to consider all the available facts.


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Adult coloring books: What’s the all the hype about?

February 27, 2016 in Stress and Coping

Adult coloring books: What’s the all the hype about? By Dr. Gina Zuccolo Adult coloring books have gained much attention and popularity within the past year or so. A quick internet search will yield numerous options available for purchase that include intricate, delicate, and sometimes complex patterns and drawings awaiting the addition of color. So what do we know about coloring and its impact on adults?


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Healthy Living through Mindfulness

September 18, 2013 in Stress and Coping

by Jennifer Richardson, M.A. In today’s fast paced world, it can be difficult to “stop and smell the roses” or for that matter even notice the roses at all. As we struggle to juggle the demands of a career, intimate and family relationships, children,and household chores we may end up sprinting over the roses while simultaneously walking the dog, texting, and scarfing down our breakfast before dropping the kids off at school and arriving to work on time.


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Humor and Coping

February 27, 2016 in Stress and Coping

Humor & Coping By Dr. Jeanne Peterson It seems like humor is an invaluable aid to maintaining our mental health. It’s popular theory that having a good sense of humor and being able to laugh about life’s ups and downs is good for our souls if not all our major bodily organs and our social lives. But why? And what about bad jokes – is all humor created equal?


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